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Bipolar Hotline

man struggling with bipolar disorderEvery year, more than 40 million people struggle with some sort of mental disorder, ranging in severity from mildly impactful to seriously debilitating.1 Bipolar disorder tends to significantly affect a person, interfering with many normal life activities. It’s estimated to affect about 2.6% of the U.S. adult population.2 Of those with bipolar disorder, almost 83% have a serious condition—a classification based on the presence of specific, severe indicators (e.g., a previous suicide attempt in last 12 months with serious lethality intent).2

Comprehensive treatment helps most people with bipolar disorder manage their symptoms, even people with very severe cases. And while statistics state that a little more than 55% of people with bipolar disorder seek treatment, that treatment is sometimes inadequate.2

A bipolar disorder helpline can help you find the best treatment available in your area, as well as information about the types of treatment you might choose from. Bipolar hotlines are always free, private, and confidential.

What Questions Should I Ask?

woman calling bipolar hotiline
People call bipolar disorder hotlines for all kinds of reasons. Many people call because they are lonely, depressed, or just looking for someone who understands what they are going through. Others call because they need resources for treatment and don’t want to choose one out of a digital phone book. A knowledgeable hotline treatment advisor can explain your options for specialists in your area. If you are interested in finding a specific type of doctor or treatment center—like women-only or faith-based—a bipolar helpline can point you in the right direction.

Some questions to ask when you call a bipolar hotline might include:

Should I Call a Bipolar Hotline? 

If you or someone you know has bipolar disorder (or suspects they may), then a bipolar hotline is for you. At the very least you can speak to someone who is compassionate and understanding, and you might come out of it with much more—like an action plan for getting treatment.

call specialist for bipolar hotline

Some reasons people call bipolar disorder hotlines include:

Mental Health Information

If you are struggling with mental health problems, you probably want to learn more about common disorders, such as depression and anxiety, which are hallmarks of bipolar disorder. Many mental health hotlines provide general information to anyone who needs it.

Bipolar Disorder Hotlines

woman struggling with bipolar disorder
Extreme highs and lows mark this disorder: during manic states, people may feel out of control, afraid that they could hurt themselves or someone else; during depressed states, they often feel hopeless and suicidal.3

Bipolar crisis hotlines help people during these extreme episodes, offering to get them into a safe place physically and mentally. They can also connect people to an emergency crisis intake center, hospital, or treatment center.

It is not uncommon for people with bipolar disorder to become suicidal. If you are afraid that you or someone you know is going to hurt themselves, you should call 911 immediately.

Sources

  1. National Institute on Mental Health. (n.d.). Any Mental Illness Among U.S. Adults.
  2. National Institute on Mental Health. (n.d.). Bipolar Disorder Among Adults.
  3. National Institute on Mental Health. (2016). Bipolar Disorder.